Carl Oberg

Controller

Carl Oberg is a native of Chicago, but left for Washington, DC as soon as he could. There he earned a B.A. in International Relations from American University, as well as a M.A. in International Commerce & Policy and a M.A. in Economics, both from George Mason University. His career has been diverse. Carl was a defense contractor Foreign Military Sales analyst, and a trade compliance officer in the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. While attending the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation’s Koch Associate Program, he was a Policy Associate at Americans for Prosperity. He was the Chief Operating Officer of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) from 2010 through 2015 and the Director of Nonprofits for Ceterus, Inc from 2015 through 2018. Most recently he was the Nonprofit Controller for CliftonLarsonAllen’s Shared Services Center. Carl lives with his wife, Caren, in the Twin Cities, Minnesota.

Related Cases
Pena v. Horan

California’s De Facto Handgun Ban is Unconstitutional

California has imposed many unconstitutional requirements upon handguns to limit purchases. By requiring non-standard or non-existent features, the state has effectively created a ban on handguns. As a result, California residents are being unfairly denied their Second Amendment protected rights. 

Rayco, LLC v. Bernhardt

Fighting to Save the Family Legacy

Emerson and Fay Ray were a young couple, recently married, when they first came to California. It was the height of the Great Depression and Emerson had heard he might be able to get a job in California pouring concrete. Now the government is threatening to destroy the legacy they built for their family.

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