Economic Freedom

Listen: MSLF talks grizzly bears with Wake Up Wyoming

Environmentalists’ efforts to keep grizzly bears protected by the Endangered Species Act puts Wyoming ranchers in harm’s way. MSLF attorney Cody Wisniewski discussed the problem and the case with Glenn Woods on Wake Up Wyoming.

Rayco, LLC v. Bernhardt

Fighting to Save the Family Legacy

Emerson and Fay Ray were a young couple, recently married, when they first came to California. It was the height of the Great Depression and Emerson had heard he might be able to get a job in California pouring concrete. Now the government is threatening to destroy the legacy they built for their family.

Wilderness Society v. Trump

Even Presidents Aren't Above the Law

President Clinton and President Obama created two illegal national monuments in rural Utah, causing serious economic harm to the hard-working westerners who live in the area. President Trump reversed the land grab but was sued for his efforts to restore the rule of law.

Crow Indian Tribe v. United States of America

A Great-Grandmother and a Grizzly Bear

Our client Mary A. Thoman, a Wyoming rancher whose family has raised sheep in western Wyoming for nearly seven decades, had to give up her family grazing land after her livestock losses to the grizzly bear became too great. One of her ranch hands was nearly killed in an attack. A judge put the bear back on the endangered species list—contrary to the recommendation of 20 years of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service research and the pleas of ranchers and citizens of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. This makes it impossible for local and state officials to manage the growing grizzly population, and virtually guarantees more loss and death.

Solenex, LLC v. Bernhardt

The Government is Not Above the Law

Federal bureaucrats, including the Secretary of the Interior, have no authority to cancel a lawfully issued oil and gas lease unless Congress has provided them that authority. Our client, Sidney Longwell, first purchased a federal oil and gas lease in Montana’s Lewis and Clark National Forest in 1982. Despite passing decade-long environmental and archeological reviews, the Clinton administration suspended his lease in 1993, and continued to suspend the lease ultimately for over two decades.